Newell Lewey - Board Member


Waterville, ME

Currently employed part time as the Community Planner for the Passamaquoddy Tribe at Pleasant Point, Newell helps coordinate research and develop lines of funding for the Tribe with the twin goals of community economic development and job creation. Newell is also an Information Technology (IT) specialist who has expertise with all aspects of computer hardware and software. Over the past 15 years, Lewey has trained many Tribal entities and individual clients in the use and functioning of various office products, personal computers, and networks.

Newell is also a part time language Immersion apprentice for the Passamaquoddy Immersion School.  Language learning and teaching has been a lifelong dream that is coming true – Newell is currently in graduate school at M.I.T. in a two year Master’s program focused on Indigenous Languages. This will benefit him greatly in years to come when teaching the language. 

Newell is serving his second elected term as Tribal Councilor for the Pleasant Point Passamaquoddy Tribe. The Council is the sole governmental structure for the Tribe and works to effect positive change for all who live in Sipayik. The Tribal Council is responsible for the development and implementation of policy and procedural issues. Lewey’s experience as a Councilor has taught him that good governance requires careful attention to the will of the people and a commitment to listen very carefully.

In describing himself, Lewey writes, “I am a father and grandfather who is concerned about my families’ future and that of all the generations of all our People who are yet to come. I have been in recovery and following the traditional ways of the Passamaquoddy for more than 29 years. In the past I have done work and volunteered with Native youth in many summer camp and fitness programs. I have also been a mentor and coach to Native youth in three Native American Olympic Games (Vancouver, Winnipeg and Denver, CO). I have also participated in and help coordinate more than 10 sacred runs which were done in an effort to unite the Wabanaki people of the Northeast. I have done some volunteering at a few of the Maine Correctional Institutions in order to support the recovery of Native American prisoners.”