May
24
7:00 AM07:00

Cutler: Puffin Boat Trip to Machias Seal Island

Machias Seal Island has the largest Atlantic Puffin colony on the Maine coast.

The trip to the island takes about an hour. Weather and sea conditions permitting, you should have over two hours on the island, with 45-60 minutes in a blind with puffins all around. The rest of the time, you’ll be on a ground-level, open-observation platform. If the boat is unable to land, you will cruise around the island with excellent opportunities to view the island’s birds.

The avian population on the Island during late May includes Atlantic Puffin, Razorbill, Arctic and Common Terns, Common Murre, Black Guillemot, and Common Eider. Other seabirds, such as Northern Gannet, Black-legged Kittiwake, gulls, shearwaters, and storm-petrels may sometimes be sighted on the trip out to the island. Bald Eagle and both Gray and Harbor Seals are spotted regularly and sightings of whales and porpoises are possible.

Transfer to and from the island requires a degree of physical mobility and surefootedness, and landing conditions will be rocky and slippery. Landing is dependent on calm sea conditions and is at your own risk. Landing and going ashore will be at the Captain’s discretion. Your safety is his first concern.

The trip will be on the Barbara Frost, a 40-foot Coast-Guard-certified passenger vessel with a restroom and an enclosed heated cabin. Wear sturdy, non-slippery footwear. Bring warm clothing and be prepared for wind, rain or spray; dressing in layers is a good idea. A camera and binoculars are musts. You may also want to bring a snack and a bottle of water.

When planning your Festival stay, especially if you are coming only for the puffins, note that foggy or windy weather may cause a boat trip to be canceled. In this case you might be able to transfer to a later day, if you are interested and have allowed the time in your plan. Otherwise you will receive a full refund.

Meet at Cutler town landing. Cutler is located on Rte 191, 13 miles from US 1 in East Machias and 14 miles from Rte 189 in West Lubec. In the Cutler harbor area, watch on the water side of the road for the blue street sign marked “Wharf Road." Please park along the road rather than in the wharf parking lot, which is heavily used by local fishing people. Then meet Captain Andy at the boat ramp. Be on time.

 
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May
24
12:00 PM12:00

Trescott/CCLC: Signature Festival Presentation: Birding by Ear by Bob Duchesne

Join Bob Duchesne—avid bird guide, Bangor Daily News columnist, and author of the official guide to the Maine Birding Trail—as he helps you demystify birding by ear. In this popular presentation, Bob will offer simple tips for mentally organizing what you’re hearing and for helping you take advantage of what you already know. Advanced birders are encouraged to share their own tips.

 
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May
24
1:00 PM13:00

Trescott/CCLC: eBird Workshop

Woody Gillies, Sallie Satterthwaite
Join the eBird community! eBird is a computer application developed by the Cornell Ornithological Laboratory in 2002 to record sightings of birds

worldwide. It has established an enormous global database that is used by hundreds of thousands of birders and scientists. This workshop will show you how to set up a free account, record bird sightings for your outings, use features of the program to explore the complete database to plan your own birding trips both locally and around the world, and access your personal bird species list. To whet your appetite see www.ebird.org.

 
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May
24
2:00 PM14:00

Trescott/CCLC: Birding by Ear Walk

Woody Gillies, Sallie Satterthwaite

Learning to identify birds by their calls and songs can greatly enhance your birding experience in the field. We will take an easy walk on mixed-forest trails near the Festival HQ to learn and reinforce birding-by-ear skills. Responsible use of common bird vocalizations will help us identify the songs and calls we hear during the walk.

Meet at CCLC main parking lot.

 
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May
24
3:00 PM15:00

Trescott/CCLC: Warbler Walk for Beginners

Colin Brown

Enjoy an afternoon of non-strenuous birding for birders of all levels, divided into groups including one for beginning birders. Locations will depend on recent bird sightings and the interests of the group. Through a combination of driving and walking, a variety of habitats are available: grasslands, freshwater wetlands, and several forest types. Waterproof footwear is recommended.

Look and listen for boreal species as well as flycatchers, vireos, thrushes, and 20 species of warblers. Raptors may include Bald Eagle, Osprey, accipiters, Broad-winged Hawk, American Kestrel, Merlin, and Northern Harrier. Wetland species may include Pied-billed Grebe, American Bittern, Canada Goose, Wood Duck, American Black Duck, Ring- necked Duck, Hooded Merganser, Solitary and Spotted Sandpipers, and Belted Kingfisher. Boreal Chickadee, Gray Jay, Spruce Grouse, and Black- backed Woodpecker have also been spotted. Grassland nesting birds such as Savannah Sparrow and Bobolink may be seen.

Meet at CCLC parking lot. You can register for either the Beginners Walk or a non-beginners walk.

 
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May
24
3:00 PM15:00

Trescott/CCLC: Medicinal and Edible Plant Walk

Fred Gralenski, Amy Zipperer

The forests and fields are filled with plants that can help to nourish and heal. Join local herbalist Amy Zipperer and naturalist Fred Gralenski on this walk, which will explore traditional uses of wild weeds as medicine and food and discuss techniques for harvesting, preservation, and preparing medicines. We may nibble a few plants along the way.

Meet at CCLC parking lot.

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May
24
3:00 PM15:00

Edmunds/MNWR: Warbler Walks

Maurry Mills, Bob Duchesne, Woody Gillies, Colin Brown Enjoy an afternoon of non-strenuous birding for birders of all
levels, divided into groups including one for beginning

birders. Locations will depend on recent bird sightings and the interests of the group. Through a combination of driving and walking, a variety of habitats are available: grasslands, freshwater wetlands, and several forest types. Waterproof footwear is recommended.

Look and listen for boreal species as well as flycatchers,
vireos, thrushes, and 20 species of warblers. Raptors may
include Bald Eagle, Osprey, accipiters, Broad-winged Hawk, American Kestrel, Merlin, and Northern Harrier. Wetland species may include Pied-billed Grebe, American Bittern, Canada Goose, Wood Duck, American Black Duck, Ring- necked Duck, Hooded Merganser, Solitary and Spotted Sandpipers, and Belted Kingfisher. Boreal Chickadee, Gray Jay, Spruce Grouse, and Black- backed Woodpecker have also been spotted. Grassland nesting birds such as Savannah Sparrow and Bobolink may be seen.

 
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May
24
6:00 PM18:00

Trescott/CCLC: Keynote Presentation: The Maine Bird Atlas

Maine Bird Atlas 2018-2022 is a five-year citizen-science project to answer the questions How many breeding and wintering birds are there in Maine? and Where can they be found? The project is a collaboration between the Maine Natural History Observatory, the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, Maine Audubon, and the Biodiversity Research Institute.

The project website is www.maine.gov/ifw/fish-wildlife/maine-bird-atlas/ and its blog, the Black-capped Chronicle, is at www1.maine.gov/ wordpress/ifwbirdatlas/.

Numerous volunteers are already engaged in mapping species distribution and abundance of breeding birds in every corner of the state. The new atlas will give conservationists not only a complete guide to Maine bird species but also an opportunity to track how populations have changed. This will help determine conservation priorities for years to come.

A light buffet supper of homemade soup and salad, breads, and desserts accompanies the presentation.

 
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May
25
6:30 AM06:30

Perry: Pottle Tree Farm Hike

Fred & Linda Gralenski

Pottle Tree Farm has diverse habitats, including hayfields, grown-up farmland, a working forest of mixed hardwood and softwood through which Boyden Stream runs, and surrounding lowlands. Apple trees and overgrown cellar holes are scattered throughout, mixed with alders, cherries, roses, and other shrubs. Trails on this private property are well-maintained and offer easy walking. There will be some moderately muddy spots, so appropriate footwear is recommended.

During this mile-long walk, look for Ruffed Grouse, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and woodpeckers in the apple trees; Wood Duck, Spotted Sandpiper, American Kestrel and other raptors; American Woodcock; and warblers along the stream and in the bigger forest—perhaps four dozen species in all.

Meet at 507 South Meadow Road, Perry. From US 1, just north of the intersection with Rte 190, turn west on South Meadow Rd (near the Perry Farmer’s Union). The tree farm is 2.5 miles from this turn. At the fork in the road, stay left. Look for signs for the tree farm on your right. Park anywhere, but please do not block the driveway to the house or barn. We will gather at the tree farm sign. There is an outhouse on the trail.

 
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May
25
6:30 AM06:30

Baring/MNWR: Barn Meadow Trail Hike

Maurry Mills

Join Maurry and other MNWR staff for an easy 3-mile hike that follows the Barn Meadow Trail through a variety of habitats: various ages of hardwood and softwood forest, a managed oak stand, wetlands, and fields.

Many neotropical migrant birds may be seen. Birds here can include Double- crested Cormorant, American Bittern, Wood Duck, American Black Duck, Ring-necked Duck, Osprey, Bald Eagle, Northern Harrier, Virginia Rail, Sora, Wilson’s Snipe, Pileated Woodpecker; Alder, Great-crested, and Least Flycatchers; Eastern Wood-pewee, vireos, thrushes, Marsh Wren, Belted Kingfisher, Bobolink, Savannah and Swamp Sparrows, and nearly two dozen species of warblers.

After walking the trail we will cross the Charlotte Rd to scan the Magurrewock Marshes from the cross dike and the eagle observation deck for waterfowl, marsh and water birds, and raptors.

Rubber boots and insect repellent are highly recommended.

Meet at the YCC Building on the grounds of the Refuge headquarters (turn onto the Headquarters Rd from Charlotte Rd and follow signs). From there you can drive your own vehicle or car pool to park along Charlotte Rd near the Barn Meadow trailhead and Magurrewock dike. CAUTION: Be alert for high-speed traffic on Charlotte Rd. Note that travel time from the CCLC Festival HQ is 45 to 60 minutes depending on the route you choose. Restrooms are at MNWR HQ in the YCC Building and at the Raven Trail parking area further up Headquarters Rd.

 
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May
25
7:00 AM07:00

Cutler: Puffin Trip to Machias Seal Island

Machias Seal Island has the largest Atlantic Puffin colony on the Maine coast.

The trip to the island takes about an hour. Weather and sea conditions
permitting, you should have over two hours on the island, with 45-60 minutes in a blind with puffins all around. The rest of the time, you’ll be on a ground-level, open-observation platform. If the boat is unable to land, you will cruise around the island with excellent opportunities to view the island’s birds.

The avian population on the Island during late May includes Atlantic Puffin, Razorbill, Arctic and Common Terns, Common Murre, Black Guillemot, and Common Eider. Other seabirds, such as Northern Gannet, Black-legged Kittiwake, gulls, shearwaters, and storm-petrels may sometimes be sighted on the trip out to the island. Bald Eagle and both Gray and Harbor Seals are spotted regularly and sightings of whales and porpoises are possible.

Transfer to and from the island requires a degree of physical mobility and surefootedness, and landing conditions will be rocky and slippery. Landing is dependent on calm sea conditions and is at your own risk. Landing and going ashore will be at the Captain’s discretion. Your safety is his first concern.

The trip will be on the Barbara Frost, a 40-foot Coast-Guard-certified passenger vessel with a restroom and an enclosed heated cabin. Wear sturdy, non-slippery footwear. Bring warm clothing and be prepared for wind, rain or spray; dressing in layers is a good idea. A camera and binoculars are musts. You may also want to bring a snack and a bottle of water.

When planning your Festival stay, especially if you are coming only for the puffins, note that foggy or windy weather may cause a boat trip to be canceled. In this case you might be able to transfer to a later day, if you are interested and have allowed the time in your plan. Otherwise you will receive a full refund.

Meet at Cutler town landing. Cutler is located on Rte 191, 13 miles from US 1 in East Machias and 14 miles from Rte 189 in West Lubec. In the Cutler harbor area, watch on the water side of the road for the blue street sign marked “Wharf Road." Please park along the road rather than in the wharf parking lot, which is heavily used by local fishing people. Then meet Captain Andy at the boat ramp. Be on time.

 
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May
25
7:00 AM07:00

Grand Lake Stream/DLLT: Musquash Stream Canoe Trip

Colin Brown

Enjoy a flatwater canoe excursion through one of the finest wetland ecosystems in Maine, guided by a DLLT staff member. Big Musquash Stream winds through over 5,000 acres of unpatterned fen and freshwater bogs, providing excellent opportunities for swallows, sparrows, Bobolink, bitterns, raptors, and ducks.

Canoes, paddles, and PFDs are provided courtesy of Chet’s Camps.

There is no fee, but space is limited and you must preregister to be included.

Meet at launch site (GPS 45.2341403, -67.6734547) in Grand Lake Stream. From Princeton, follow US 1 north for 3.5 miles to

Passamaquoddy Indian Township, and turn left onto Grand Lake Stream Rd. There will be DESBF signs. In about 3.5 miles you enter Grand Lake Stream and the road becomes Milford Rd. About a half mile later (4.1 miles from US 1), you will arrive at a wide-open marsh with a bridge across the flowage. We will launch from that bridge. Nearest restrooms: Princeton gas stations and grocery store.

 
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May
25
7:00 AM07:00

Lubec/MCHT: Boot Head Hike

Bill & Sallie Satterthwaite

Boot Head Preserve features some of the most dramatic views of the Maine coastline. Enjoy it, along with fabulous birding, during this circular hike a little more than 2 miles long. Some trail sections are gradual and smooth, while other sections along the rocky coast require a lot of up-and-down hiking over a rocky trail. Sturdy footwear is recommended, and perhaps trekking poles.

A small bog near the trailhead offers the possibility of Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Hermit Thrush, Nashville Warbler, Palm Warbler, Lincoln’s Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow and Purple Finch.

The coniferous forest has large numbers of Magnolia Warblers and Black-throated Green Warblers. We should also encounter Red-breasted Nuthatch, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Winter Wren, Black-and-white Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler and Ovenbird. Spruce Grouse and Boreal Chickadee are often present.

Stands of stunted spruce along the rocky headlands provide habitat for Blackpoll Warbler and Golden-crowned Kinglet. Common Eider and Black Guillemot will be on the water far below. Merlin have nested along the cliffs in some years.

This hike is limited to 15 participants.

Meet at the Boot Head parking lot. From Whiting or the CCLC, take Rte 189 east toward Lubec. After 5.7 miles from Whiting or 4.0 miles from the CCLC turn right onto Rte 191 (Dixie Rd). Drive south 2.7 miles and turn left onto Boot Cove Rd, then drive east 1.9 miles. Or if coming from Lubec or West Quoddy Head via South Lubec Rd, turn onto Boot Cove Rd near the sharp bend in South Lubec Rd and drive west 3.9 miles, passing the Hamilton Cove Preserve. There are parking lots on both sides of the road. No restrooms.

 
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May
25
7:00 AM07:00

Topsfield: Burn Road Hike

Marion Bates

The Burn Road in northern Washington County is known for its excellent boreal birding. Spruce Grouse, Black-backed Woodpecker, Gray Jay, Boreal Chickadee, Olive-sided and Yellow-bellied Flycatchers, plus both Crossbill species are frequently seen here. We will also look on nearby roads for Mourning Warbler.

We will likely walk 3-4 miles, at a slow pace, on flat and dry gravel surfaces. This trip is appropriate for birders with any level of skill or experience.

Blackflies and mosquitoes will be swarming, so be sure to bring insect repellent and wear clothing that covers your skin (hat, long-

sleeved shirt, long pants, gloves, and closed shoes). You should also bring water and lunch.

Meet at Topsfield Post Office, on the left on US 1 just before the junction with Rte 6. This is 34 miles north of the Moosehorn NWR HQ in Baring. Travel time from CCLC Festival HQ is close to two hours. The closest location to fill up on gas, pick up drinks and snacks, and use restrooms is the Irving station in Princeton, 16 miles south on US 1.

 
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May
25
10:00 AM10:00

West Quoddy Head/Quoddy Narrows: Intertidal Discovery

Gayle Kraus

Search rocky, sandy and muddy intertidal environments for the invertebrates shorebirds eat! Dr. Gayle Kraus, Professor of Marine Ecology at University of Maine/Machias, and some of her students will help you learn about these "delicious" creatures.

Wear rubber boots and clothes appropriate for clambering though rock pools and muddy areas. Don’t forget sun and wind protection.

Note: If the weather is seriously rainy, this event may move indoors to the UMM Science building in Machias, 35 minutes away.

Meet by the picnic tables in the large parking lot at West Quoddy Head State Park. From the CCLC, turn left onto Rte 189 toward Lubec. Proceed for xx miles and turn right onto South Lubec Rd. Follow the road for xx miles to the Park. Turn right after entering the park and follow the driveway around to the parking and picnic table area. Restrooms are on your right as the driveway loops toward the parking lot and tables.

 
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May
25
1:00 PM13:00

Baring/MNWR: Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge Open House

Refuge Staff

The Moosehorn NWR headquarters building will be open for
visitors this afternoon. There will be exhibits for viewing,
including a showcase of wildlife items that have been seized at our borders from smugglers. Photos of wildlife captured by our trail cams will be running throughout the afternoon, and there will be displays showing refuge habitat, wildlife, and management activities.

Refuge staff will be present to answer questions and provide recommendations on hiking trails, fishing, hunting, birding hot spots, wildlife inventory and monitoring projects, and habitat management. Refuge maps and brochures, posters, and the Where People Care About Wildlife DVD will be available.

There will be two guided tours of parts of the refuge not normally open to the public; tours will leave the refuge office at 1:30 and 3:30 pm.

Location: MNWR Headquarters, 103 Headquarters Rd, Baring. From the north: At the junction of US 1 and Charlotte Rd (where Baring is marked on the map, southwest of Calais), travel 2.4 miles south on Charlotte Rd and turn right onto Headquarters Rd. From Whiting: Drive north for 14 miles on US 1 and turn left onto Ayers Junction Rd. Travel 6.1 miles and turn right onto Charlotte Rd. Travel 8.4 miles (crossing Station Rd in Charlotte) and turn left onto Headquarters Rd. On Headquarters Rd, take the first right onto a gravel road and proceed past the YCC Building to the Visitor Center. Restrooms.

 
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May
25
2:00 PM14:00

Pembroke: Pennamaquan River Walk

Fred & Linda Gralenski

This easy hike will focus on the alewife, Alosa pseudoharengus, an anadromous fish that migrates up rivers about this time of year to spawn in lakes.

The fisheries managers, both state and federal, are taking a closer look at the aspect of rivers and streams being nurseries for the Gulf of Maine; in 2016 the St. Croix River was opened to spawning anadromous fish after an 18-year closure.

We should see Bald Eagle, Osprey and other birds feeding on the migrating alewives; and although river herring don’t make spectacular leaps like salmon, they can negotiate some very fast water, and their capabilities are impressive.

We will discuss the life cycle of diadromous fish, and
how they can survive in both salt and fresh water, their impact (both real and imagined) on freshwater lakes, and their importance as forage for birds, mammals, and other fish. We will net a few alewives and show their interesting anatomy as plankton feeders, and their use as nutrition for soils, lobsters, and people.

This event includes a small amount of driving around the river and the lake.

Meet in Pembroke on US 1 just north of Little Falls Rd. Park in the parking lot that is next to the falls and the (closed) Crossroads Restaurant. No restrooms.

 
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May
25
4:00 PM16:00

Lubec/DCC: Beach Birding & Beer at Mowry Beach and Lubec Brewing Company

Colin Brown

Explore the shoreline habitats of Mowry Beach, then tour the easternmost craft beer brewery in the US.

Mowry Beach is an uncommon and beautiful example of sandy beach in the region. Proceeding along an all-accessible beach and marshland boardwalk, we’ll search for shorebirds, warblers, gulls, and more.

Afterward, we are invited to drive or stroll a few blocks to the Lubec Brewing Company in picturesque downtown Lubec. Owners Gale and McGinley will give us a firsthand look at this bustling local business with a special tour and tasting.

The Festival event ends at 6, but you might decide to linger on for drinks and dinner with live music, or try one of the other popular eating places in the scenic harbor area.

 
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May
25
6:30 PM18:30

Baring/MNWR: Moving Event: Rails, Wrens & Nighthawks; Whippoorwills, Woodcocks & Owls

Maurry Mills and Refuge staff

Join us for all or part of this evening event.

We will begin with a short introduction to the identification and calls of the rails, snipe, nighthawks, whippoorwills, and owls we hope to find.

Next we will carpool from the YCC Building to the abandoned railroad bed off US 1, that runs between the Lower Barn Meadow and Lower Magurrewock Marshes. There we will walk along the railroad bed in search of Marsh Wren, American Bittern, Virginia Rail, Sora, Wilson’s Snipe, Common Nighthawk, American Black Duck, Wood Duck, Ring-necked Duck, Canada Goose, Common Yellowthroat, Yellow Warbler, Eastern Kingbird, Swamp Sparrow, Cedar Waxwing, and Warbling Vireo.

As dusk approaches we will drive to a singing ground on the Refuge and listen and watch for American Woodcock. The male flies from his daytime cover to an opening where he performs his courtship flights, precisely 15 to 22 minutes after sunset, depending on sky conditions. He begins by making a series of nasal "peents" before ascending several hundred feet in the air and spiraling back to the same spot on the ground. In addition to the "Timberdoodle" listen for White-throated Sparrow, Hermit Thrush, Veery, Common Nighthawk, and several owls. Several species of frogs may also be heard including Spring Peeper, Gray Tree Frog, Green Frog, and Pickerel Frog.

After observing the woodcock we will drive along the Ice House Road to listen for the call of the Eastern Whippoorwill, and play recordings of several species of owls in hopes of getting them to respond. Species that nest at Moosehorn include the tiny Saw-whet and the larger Barred and Great Horned Owls.

We will continue driving along the interior Refuge roads looking and listening for more woodcock, owls, and nighthawks as well as for mammals such as Beaver, White-tailed Deer, Moose, Black Bear, and Bobcat.

We will end the trip where the Refuge road intersects with the Charlotte Road, directly across from the Moosehorn NWR Headquarters driveway.

Meet at the YCC Building at MNWR Headquarters. From the Charlotte Rd turn into the entrance to Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge Headquarters and follow the signs. Restrooms in the YCC Building.

 
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May
26
6:30 AM06:30

North Lubec/DCC: Pike Lands Hike

Bill & Sallie Satterthwaite

Pike Lands Conservation Area, named in honor of Radcliffe and Sumner Pike, has several short trails on the North Lubec peninsula that include diverse habitats. The birds seen and heard will depend upon the timing of the season, but we have had good luck with common field, forest, and coastal species of the region, including warblers.

The Cove trail to Cobscook Bay is an easy half-mile out-and-back walk with apple orchard, mixed forest, and a shallow beach that borders on some salt marsh. The Huckins Beach / West Loop combined trail to South Bay is a one-mile loop with somewhat challenging walking at the far end. It passes through open woodland and spruce-fir and cedar forest.

The 500-foot Arboretum Trail winds among some unusual shrubs and trees that Radcliffe Pike, a noted horticulturalist, brought back
from his world travels. Rhododendrons are likely to be
in bloom.

Being on either side of a narrow peninsula, these walks can have coastal fog, so bring appropriate outerwear. Boots are recommended.

Meet at the Huckins Beach trailhead, which is in the first Pike Lands parking lot (GPS 44.899060, -67.051364). From the CCLC, turn left onto Rte 189 toward Lubec. After 7.3 miles, soon after the Eastland Motel, turn left at McFadden's Variety onto North Lubec Rd. After 5.3 miles (as the road rises shortly after Bailey Lane and house #1043), turn left into the first Pike Lands parking lot, or park along the road or in the second Pike Lands parking lot which is on the right about 0.1 mile further along. Please do not park in the driveway across the road from the first lot. No restroom.

 
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May
26
7:00 AM07:00

Lubec: Moving Event: West Quoddy Head & Lubec Sand Bar

Colin Brown

Join us for an early morning coastal foray with a little hiking!
Quoddy Head State Park is the easternmost point of land in the United States, and is a must-see for any visitor to the area. Carrying Place Cove Bog is considered one of the most significant peatlands in the eastern United States, and the dramatic cliffs are often some of the foggiest on the coast.

A variety of habitats exist at the Park. The Green Point path passes through low dense balsam fir and red spruce forest. The Peat Bog Trail includes a boardwalk over a 7-acre boreal peat bog that is surrounded by black spruce. Many neotropical migrant birds may be seen along the coastal and
inland trails and the bog walk. Permanent residents include Spruce Grouse, Gray Jay, Common Raven, Boreal Chickadee and White-winged and Red Crossbills. Some other species include Common Eider, Merlin, Yellow-bellied Flycatchers, kinglets, Swainson’s, Bicknell's, and Hermit Thrush, two dozen species of warblers, Lincoln’s Sparrows, Dark-eyed Junco, and seabirds.

Along the Lubec Sand Bar we will look for gulls and other sea birds, sea and freshwater ducks, herons, and shorebirds. We may see some migrating shorebirds, although most of those pass through in late summer after breeding in the far north of Canada.

The order in which we will visit locations will be determined by the tides, for the best shorebird viewing.

Meet at the CCLC parking lot to organize carpooling. Restrooms are available there and at Quoddy Head State Park.

 
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May
26
7:00 AM07:00

Perry/Passamaquoddy Tribal Land: Sipayik Walking Path Hike

Chris Bartlett

Join us for an enjoyable bayside stroll as we look for birds in diverse coastal habitats. The paved path, once part of a railroad bed, is level and flat, with panoramic views of the bay and of extensive mudflats. We can also make short, easy forays on grassy meadow trails and along beaches.

A wide variety of migrating warblers and other passerines can be seen feeding and singing all along the path during early morning including American Redstart, Wilson's Warbler, Blue-headed Vireo, and Ruby-crowned Kinglet. Savannah Sparrow and Nelson's Sparrow nest in the open fields next to the ocean, and Bobolinks have been seen. Look for shorebirds such as Short- billed Dowitcher and Wilson's Snipe around the edges of the brackish pond, and watch for several species of swallow. Swamp Sparrow and Common Yellowthroat can be found in the marshy areas. Harbor Seals frequent the shoreline.

The path and shoreline are open and often breezy, so bringing warm and windproof layers of clothing is recommended.

Meet at the southern end of Sipayik Trail in Pleasant Point. From US 1 in Perry turn onto Rte 190 (County Rd) and follow it for a little over 1.5 miles to the far end of Pleasant Point village. Turn left onto Bayview Drive and follow this somewhat winding road for a third of a mile, bearing right at the fork with Middle Rd (at the Beatrice Rafferty School), until an intersection where Bayview crosses into Treatment Plant Rd.

After 700 feet Treatment Plant Rd ends in a circle near the south end of the trail. You can park in one of the two marked spaces or on the circle shoulder. No restrooms.

 
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May
26
7:00 AM07:00

Cobscook Bay region: All-Day Van Excursion

Woody Gillies, Bill Kolodnicki

This popular moving event is limited to 10 participants and fills quickly.

We will bird in five or six special habitats in the Cobscook Bay area to have the opportunity to see an inordinate variety of birds. Stops will be in spruce-fir forests, brush and pole-stage timber, ocean and tidal flats, and fresh and tidal marshes—habitats for a great variety of species from hummingbirds to gannets.

This excursion will be at a leisurely pace to allow you to focus on new and/or favorite birds. Over the course of the day, it will be possible to see most of the birds expected to be in this area. Bring along waterproof boots and layers of clothing. Bug repellant and a refillable water bottle are recommended.

We will picnic along the way. You can either bring lunch or purchase something when we stop at a convenience store.

Meet at CCLC Festival HQ. Restrooms will be available at some stops.

 
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May
26
7:00 AM07:00

Cutler: Puffin Trip to Machias Seal Island

Machias Seal Island has the largest Atlantic Puffin colony on the Maine coast.

The trip to the island takes about an hour. Weather and sea conditions permitting, you should have over two hours on the island, with 45-60 minutes in a blind with puffins all around. The rest of the time, you’ll be on a ground-level, open-observation platform. If the boat is unable to land, you will cruise around the island with excellent opportunities to view the island’s birds.

The avian population on the Island during late May includes Atlantic Puffin, Razorbill, Arctic and Common Terns, Common Murre, Black Guillemot, and Common Eider. Other seabirds, such as Northern Gannet, Black-legged Kittiwake, gulls, shearwaters, and storm-petrels may sometimes be sighted on the trip out to the island. Bald Eagle and both Gray and Harbor Seals are spotted regularly and sightings of whales and porpoises are possible.

Transfer to and from the island requires a degree of physical mobility and surefootedness, and landing conditions will be rocky and slippery. Landing is dependent on calm sea conditions and is at your own risk. Landing and going ashore will be at the Captain’s discretion. Your safety is his first concern.

The trip will be on the Barbara Frost, a 40-foot Coast-Guard-certified passenger vessel with a restroom and an enclosed heated cabin. Wear sturdy, non-slippery footwear. Bring warm clothing and be prepared for wind, rain or spray; dressing in layers is a good idea. A camera and binoculars are musts. You may also want to bring a snack and a bottle of water.

When planning your Festival stay, especially if you are coming only for the puffins, note that foggy or windy weather may cause a boat trip to be canceled. In this case you might be able to transfer to a later day, if you are interested and have allowed the time in your plan. Otherwise you will receive a full refund.

Meet at Cutler town landing. Cutler is located on Rte 191, 13 miles from US 1 in East Machias and 14 miles from Rte 189 in West Lubec. In the Cutler harbor area, watch on the water side of the road for the blue street sign marked “Wharf Road." Please park along the road rather than in the wharf parking lot, which is heavily used by local fishing people. Then meet Captain Andy at the boat ramp. Be on time.

 
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May
26
8:00 AM08:00

Trescott/MCHT: Moose Cove Hike

Kirk Gentalen

The Moose Cove area of the Maine Coast Heritage Trust’s Bog Brook Preserve is full of beauty and wildlife, especially birds. We will start this walk with a little sea watching from an open panoramic viewshed and then walk the nearby Moose Cove Trail which cuts thru a variety of habitats while affording several different views of the cove and open ocean. Alder thickets, hardwood forest dominated by maple and birch, and cedar and spruce forest will all be explored. Open canopies and vistas provide views of local birds and other wildlife.

We will hope to see sea birds, including alcids, sea ducks, and Great Cormorant as well as warblers, vireos, and other songbirds.

Trail conditions will be mostly level with uneven stretches and a short, steep incline section to get up Moose Ridge. Make sure to wear good walking/hiking shoes, and bring water, binoculars, and a camera. Spotting scopes are also useful for the sea watch portion of this session. Kirk will have his scope available for participants.

The 0.2-mile path from the parking lot to the Moose Cove scenic outlook is “All-Accessible.”

Meet at Moose Cove parking lot. From CCLC: Turn left onto Rte 189 east toward Lubec. After 3.9 miles turn right onto Rte 191 (Dixie Rd) and proceed south. After 6.7 miles turn left onto Moose River Rd. From Cutler: Follow 191 through many twists and turns for about 7 miles, passing the Bog Brook Preserve entrance at Norse Pond Rd. 1.5 miles north of that, turn right onto Moose River Road. Drive to the parking lot at the end of Moose River Rd, staying left at the Bog Brook Rd fork. No restroom.

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May
26
11:00 AM11:00

CANCELLED-Calais Red Beach/NPS: Saint Croix Island International Historic Site

Park Ranger

A National Park Service Ranger will share the story of Saint Croix Island International Historic Site, a monument to the beginning of the United States and Canada.

In 1604 Pierre Dugua, Sieur de Mons, accompanied by Samuel Champlain and 77 others, established on Saint Croix Island one of the earliest European settlements on the North Atlantic coast, preceding Jamestown (1607) and Plymouth (1620). From here, Champlain explored and charted the coast as far south as Cape Cod.

The insights gained from the Saint Croix settlement and from further exploration formed the foundation for a more successful settlement at Port Royal and for an enduring French presence in North America that continues to the present day.

While the focus of this session is local history, birding facts from this earliest settlement will also be shared.

Meet at the Saint Croix Island International Historical Site Visitor Center. From Calais drive 8 miles south on US 1 and turn left at the IHS sign. From Whiting drive 32.3 miles north on US 1 and turn right at the HIS sign; this is 3.8 miles after you pass Robbinston. Restrooms are available.

 
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May
26
1:30 PM13:30

Whiting/DCC: Orange River Canoe Trip

Colin Brown

Join Colin for an easy flatwater paddle through the exemplary wetland and forested habitats of the Orange River Conservation Area. This trip is suitable for all canoe skill levels including beginners. Canoes, paddles, and PFDs are provided courtesy of the Cobscook Community Learning Center.

The Orange River is an important habitat for inland wading birds and waterfowl in Downeast Maine, providing undisturbed nesting and uncontaminated feeding areas.

You must preregister in order to participate. Meet at the CCLC at 1:30 to carpool to the launch site. Cars will depart PROMPTLY from CCLC at 1:45.

Please note: The parking area at the Orange River Landing is very small and hard to maneuver in. If you must drive yourself separately, please park along the road and not in the lot.

 
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May
26
1:30 PM13:30

Eastport: Birdwatching Cruise on the Pier Pressure

Chris Bartlett

The Pier Pressure, a Coast Guard-certified 45-foot lobster boat, will transport you throughout Head Harbor Passage and its many Canadian islands. Amid spectacular scenery and plentiful wildlife, you will motor up close to islands where you may encounter shearwaters, storm-petrels, kittiwakes, cormorants, Ospreys, hawks, Bald Eagles, gulls, terns, and alcids. Seals, porpoises, herring weirs, salmon pens, and lighthouses will be part of the tour. Captain Butch Harris has explored these waters all of his life, and our festival guide will also be onboard to help out with sightings.

Bring your binoculars and camera! Wear warm clothing and sturdy shoes with non-slippery soles. Bring windproof and waterproof layers.

If the trip is canceled, and you cannot or do not want to try for a later day, you will receive a full refund.

Meet at the main pier in Eastport. From US 1 in Perry, take Rte 190 into Eastport. At the end of Rte 190 turn left onto Water Street. The pier is the next right. Parking and toilet facilities are available at the pier, and there is a toilet on the boat. Depending on the tide, boarding the boat may require descending a steep ramp. We will call you to clarify departure location.

 
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May
26
2:00 PM14:00

Trescott/CCLC: Medicinal and Edible Plant Walk

Fred Gralenski, Amy Zipperer

The forests and fields are filled with plants that can help to nourish and heal.

Join local herbalist Amy Zipperer and naturalist Fred Gralenski on this walk, which will explore traditional uses of wild weeds as medicine and food and discuss techniques for harvesting, preservation, and preparing medicines. We may nibble a few plants along the way.

Meet at CCLC parking lot.

 
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May
26
2:00 PM14:00

CANCELLED-Calais Red Beach/NPS: Saint Croix Island International Historic Site

Park Ranger

A National Park Service Ranger will share the story of Saint Croix Island International Historic Site, a monument to the beginning of the United States and Canada.

In 1604 Pierre Dugua, Sieur de Mons, accompanied by Samuel Champlain and 77 others, established on Saint Croix Island one of the earliest European settlements on the North Atlantic coast, preceding Jamestown (1607) and Plymouth (1620). From here, Champlain explored and charted the coast as far south as Cape Cod.

The insights gained from the Saint Croix settlement and from further exploration formed the foundation for a more successful settlement at Port Royal and for an enduring French presence in North America that continues to the present day.

While the focus of this session is local history, birding facts from this earliest settlement will also be shared.

Meet at the Saint Croix Island International Historical Site Visitor Center. From Calais drive 8 miles south on US 1 and turn left at the IHS sign. From Whiting drive 32.3 miles north on US 1 and turn right at the HIS sign; this is 3.8 miles after you pass Robbinston. Restrooms are available.

 
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May
26
2:00 PM14:00

Trescott/CCLC: Presentation: Overview of Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge

Maurry Mills

The Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge protects 30,000 acres of land dedicated to wildlife habitat in Downeast Maine. Since its establishment in 1937 the refuge has been managed to provide habitat for a variety of migratory birds and other wildlife. The American Woodcock has been extensively managed at Moosehorn. The talk will describe the habitat management methods of the refuge and the wildlife inventory, monitoring, and research projects that measure the effects of management. Some of the species that will be discussed include Ruffed and Spruce Grouse, American Woodcock, Bald Eagle, waterfowl, secretive marsh and water birds, and amphibians.

 
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May
26
3:00 PM15:00

Trescott/CCLC: Presentation: Owls Are Easy

Kirk Gentalen

Everybody loves owls. You can tell this is true because everybody has an owl story or two to tell. Owls are fascinating and mysterious and have been revered by cultures since the beginning of cultures.

For the past 25 years Kirk Gentalen has been an active owl watcher. “I especially like owls because if you want to see them, you often have to meet them halfway.” Gentalen notes. “But with a little discipline and effort your chances of finding them increase.”

 
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May
26
4:00 PM16:00

Trescott/CCLC: Storytelling: Lighthouse Keeping, Islands & Birdwatching

Delia Mae Farris

CCLC Festival HQ —

Descended from a tradition of story tellers, Delia Mae Farris has a degree in biology from University of Maine at Orono. She weaves an intriguing blend of facts about island bird-watching with folklore from her mother Ruth Corbett’s lighthouse keeping family. In the 1950s, Delia’s lobster fisherman father Glenn Farris initiated the puffin birding trips from Cutler harbor to Machias Seal Island. Her uncle, Captain Purcell Corbett, succeeded Glenn as a reliable ocean guide aboard his Audubon Queen, which he designed and built. Captain Andy Patterson carries on this able seamanship lineage with his Bold Coast Charter Company boat tours. Captain Andy’s vessel, the Barbara Frost, passes around Little River Island on its way to and from Machias Seal Island.

Ruth Corbett Farris with her seven brothers and sisters grew up on Little River at the mouth of Cutler Harbor. As an island-loving girl, Ruth laid out the bodies of migrating birds that unfortunately perished when they struck the light tower. Ruth grew up to become a folk art carver of our local sea bird species, including puffins, terns, gulls, and cormorants.

 
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May
26
7:30 PM19:30

Edmunds/MNWR: Wildlife and Woodcock Management Hike

Maurry Mills, Bob Duchesne

On this evening wildlife and birding outing, we’ll explore a diverse selection of forest and field habitats. We will visit areas managed specifically by Maine Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to benefit woodcock; these same areas also provide homes to more than fifty other species. This property is also home to Black Bear, Eastern Coyote, White-tailed Deer, Porcupine, Snowshoe Hare, and Ruffed Grouse. Barred Owl, Saw-whet Owl, and Great Horned Owl are all resident and with luck we might hear one or two of these, as well as Common Nighthawk.

There may be a drive to facilitate wildlife sightings, followed by a short hike. Bring a headlamp or flashlight, as it will be after sunset when we return.

Meet at the CCLC parking lot following the Sunday evening dinner. Be prepared to drive/ carpool to a designated location. Restrooms at the CCLC.

 
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May
27
6:00 AM06:00

Campobello/RCIP: Moving Event: Roosevelt Campobello International Park

Susan Cline
This is a driving and walking tour within Roosevelt Campobello International Park. Campobello Island is a stopover for thousands of migrating birds. The habitat includes marine shoreland, salt and freshwater marshes, sphagnum bogs, coniferous, deciduous and mixed forest, forest edges, thickets, brushy and open fields, cliffs, banks, and ponds. Over 150 avian species breed here or on nearby islands or migrate through the area, including Double-crested Cormorant, Great Blue Heron, American Black Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Common Eider, Spruce Grouse, Killdeer, Spotted Sandpiper, and many varieties of gulls.

We begin with a small pond behind the Adventure Center where we may expect a variety of warblers, sparrows, finches, flycatchers, vireos, and Gray Catbird.

Next we will explore the open fields and wooded areas of Friar’s Head. Here we may expect woodpeckers, raptors, corvids, Eastern Phoebe, thrushes, warblers, sparrows, finches, gulls, cormorants, Black Guillemot, and other water birds.

Our last stop will be Eagle Hill Bog, with a short boardwalk hike amid unique vegetation, featuring interpretive signage,

benches, and a viewing tower. Here we may expect raptors, corvids, warblers, sparrows, finches, flycatchers, vireos, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, and thrushes.
If time permits we may visit more areas.

Meet at the Adventure Center on Campobello.
From Whiting: Take Rte 189 to Lubec. Follow signs to the
Campobello Bridge and US/Canada border crossing.
After you pass through Canadian customs, drive up the hill
and turn right into the Adventure Center parking lot. There is a 24-hour restroom at Friar’s Head; the Adventure Center opens at 10 Atlantic time (9 Eastern).

Make sure you have your passport or equivalent! See Travel to Canada in the General Information section.

 
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May
27
7:30 AM07:30

Columbia & Addison: Moving Event: Blueberry Barrens and Addison Marsh

Amy Meehan, Maurry Mills Join us for this trip to the barrens of Washington County in search of
nesting Upland Sandpiper and Vesper

Sparrow. Large sandy plains that were created by retreating glaciers are ideal for cultivating low-bush blueberries, a major agricultural crop in this part of the state. We’ll be on the lookout for additional species that prefer these open and shrubby habitats, including Palm Warbler, Lincoln’s and Savannah Sparrows, Eastern Meadowlark, and Northern Harrier.

While we’re in the area, we’ll swing by Addison Marsh to look for migrating shorebirds and waterfowl such as Black-bellied Plover, Red Knot, and Green-winged Teal. This large salt marsh attracts a variety of waders and dabblers, and offers good viewing opportunities from dry ground.

If time and weather permit, we may continue our birding in the South Addison or Harrington area for warblers and other migrants.

No strenuous hiking is involved. Bring along snacks and a drink.

Meet at Elmer’s Country Store in Columbia Falls on US 1, on the left if you are heading south, just past Wild Blueberry Land (large painted blueberries). Elmer’s has gas, a restaurant, a convenience store, and rest rooms.

 
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May
27
8:00 AM08:00

Cutler: Puffin Trip to Machias Seal Island

Chris Bartlett

Additional trips on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday

Machias Seal Island has the largest Atlantic Puffin colony on the Maine coast.

The trip to the island takes about an hour. Weather
and sea conditions permitting, you should have over two hours on the
island, with 45-60 minutes in a blind with puffins all around. The rest of the time, you’ll be on a ground-level, open-observation platform. If the boat is unable to land, you will cruise around the island with excellent opportunities to view the island’s birds.

The avian population on the Island during late May includes Atlantic Puffin, Razorbill, Arctic and Common Terns, Common Murre, Black Guillemot, and Common Eider. Other seabirds, such as Northern Gannet, Black-legged Kittiwake, gulls, shearwaters, and storm-petrels may sometimes be sighted on the trip out to the island. Bald Eagle and both Gray and Harbor Seals are spotted regularly and sightings of whales and porpoises are possible.

Transfer to and from the island requires a degree of physical mobility and surefootedness, and landing conditions will be rocky and slippery. Landing is dependent on calm sea conditions and is at your own risk. Landing and going ashore will be at the Captain’s discretion. Your safety is his first concern.

The trip will be on the Barbara Frost, a 40-foot Coast-Guard-certified passenger vessel with a restroom and an enclosed heated cabin. Wear sturdy, non-slippery footwear. Bring warm clothing and be prepared for wind, rain or spray; dressing in layers is a good idea. A camera and binoculars are musts. You may also want to bring a snack and a bottle of water.

When planning your Festival stay, especially if you are coming only for the puffins, note that foggy or windy weather may cause a boat trip to be canceled. In this case you might be able to transfer to a later day, if you are interested and have allowed the time in your plan. Otherwise you will receive a full refund.

Meet at Cutler town landing. Cutler is located on Rte 191, 13 miles from US 1 in East Machias and 14 miles from Rte 189 in West Lubec. In the Cutler harbor area, watch on the water side of the road for the blue street sign marked “Wharf Road." Please park along the road rather than in the wharf parking lot, which is heavily used by local fishing people. Then meet Captain Andy at the boat ramp. Be on time.

 
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May
27
7:00 PM19:00

Trescott/CCLC: Old Time Music Jam

The CCLC is, at its heart, a community center with year-round activities for local residents and visitors. Twice a month beginning and experienced musicians alike gather ‘round for this music circle, to play together or just to listen and enjoy.

All birders are invited to join in for this closing event of the Memorial Day weekend. Bring an instrument or a song to share if you’d like! Refreshments are served and donations are welcome.

 
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