Artisans at RiceFest 2016

 

Manuela Brice: Fiber Arts

Originally from Ravensburg, Germany, an Imperial Free City and an important trading centre in the Middle Ages, Manuela Brice moved to the United States in 1995. Manuela fell in love with knitting when she was 5 and taught herself to knit from her mother’s single knitting book. She got hooked on knitting & crocheting before she learned reading, writing, and math.

Manuela's rich ancestral background is mirrored in her exquisite hand-spun yarns and her hand-knit designs which give witness to extraordinary craftsmanship as well as her distinct design lines fit for royalty. Manuela has been part of a local artisan scene for as long as she can remember. From Germany to New England's rich crafts to beautiful & sunny Sonoma County in Northern California to avantgarde Asbury Park at the Jersey Shore to Eastport, the small island 7 miles out at sea off the coast of Maine, she allows local elements to be part of her design process, every piece of land calling on a different part of the soul waiting to be expressed.

Manuela creates fashionable contemporary knitwear that is deeply feminine and elegantly functional – you can visit her Etsy shop to see her work. Besides being a fiber artist, Manuela is a mother, wife, yoga teacher/practitioner & singer.

 

Tim Christensen: Potter

Tim Christensen lives near the coast in eastern Maine and has done most of his work in the last few years in a tiny off-the-grid cabin in Roque Bluffs. "My time there is magical, the stillness seductive. I also work at the new house my partner and I built in Franklin. The hustle and bustle of family life provide plenty of incentive for focus, and I believe sharpens my work."

By working with black and white, Tim invokes a world where humans are counterparts of the creatures he creates. Freed from humano-centrism, people and animals compete and cooperate, interact and take notice of each other as equals. Tim's work depicts the conflict of being a human who loves the earth but needs resources to live, of coping with animal instincts made irrelevant in today's culture, and of the challenges of balancing the needs of the individual with the needs of the community. See more of Tim’s work at www.timchristensenporcelain.com.

 

Ryan Cross: Pyrography (wood-burning)

Ryan is a self-taught artist from Downeast Maine who makes pyrographic artwork – intricate designs burned into wood, both functional and decorative pieces. His work will be on display and for sale at RiceFest. "Each piece is created with Intention and Love for reflection and Please, BEE~AWARE, these items are Enchanted." See more of his work at www.theenchantedforest11.com.

 

 

 

Viola Francis: Basket Making

 

Richard Klyver: Metal Casting

Richard Klyver is a graduate of the School of Visual Arts in New York City, but has pursued his artistic adventures in East Africa, Madagascar, Brazil and Mexico. Between 1996 and 2005 he was an Artist in Residence at the University of Pennsylvania. Klyver is intimately familiar with the bronze casting process and his personal hand and oversight is in the process all the way from conception to patina. Mr. Klyver lives in Eastport, Maine where he has his own foundry and sculpting studio. He is recognized as a leading expert in mold making and bronze pouring. This knowledge and skill enable him to cast everything from the miniature of a live dragonfly to the mass of a one ton dinosaur skull.

 

Gump Miller: Canoe Building

 

Reed Peters: Whittling / Wood Carving 

 

Belinda Tiess: Dreamcatcher Making

 

Shanna Wheelock: Encaustic Painting

Shanna Wheelock is a sculpter, potter, weaver, and painter in Lubec. She is known as the "Easternmost Potter in the United States," and works primarily with mid-range stoneware to create unique functional pottery and sculptures. At this year’s RiceFest she will be demonstrating one of her many skills, encaustic painting – a technique that involves mixing pigment with hot wax.

Shanna volunteers her time to help to build the local arts community and was featured as the narrator in the 2009 documentary film "Lubec Arts Alive." She has enjoyed facilitating workshops for women's groups, inmates, children, and exchange students, and is a state certified visual arts teacher who has taught in the public school system for many years. To learn more about her work, visit www.shannawheelock.com.